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http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20100723/tc_nf/74445A tablet computer for $35. That's the estimated retail price of a prototype basic touchscreen tablet developed by the government of India. The device, which uses the open-source Linux operating system, was unveiled Thursday by Kapil Sibal, India's human-resource development minister. "This is our answer to M.I.T.'s $100 computer," he told the Economic Times. $10, Eventually His reference is to the $100 laptop that M.I.T. Media Lab cofounder Nicholas Negroponte set as a goal when he founded One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) in 2005. The main idea was to build an innovative, inexpensive computer to be used by children in developing countries. But the Indian government thought that even $100 was too expensive, so it started developing its own. In the meantime, OLPC's laptop was developed and released, but at an eventual price of about $200. OLPC announced in the spring that it would develop and launch a basic tablet computer for $99. The Indian tablet was developed by researchers and students at the Indian Institute of Technology and the Indian Institute of Science at Sibal's urging. He has told news media that the goal is to eventually get the price closer to $10. The Indian government, which is undertaking a major educational technology initiative, will subsidize the tablet, bringing the near-term price down to $20. The prototype has no hard drive but uses a memory card, can run on solar power, and incorporates open-source software. The government said it supports web browsing, word processing, video conferencing, and other applications. A previous effort by the Indian government, announced last year, to develop a $10 laptop ended with a prototype handheld device that has apparently been abandoned. 'Have a Few on Hand' The government has said that at least one Taiwanese manufacturer, in addition to other computer makers, is interested in building the device, although no arrangements have been made. Laura DiDio, a research fellow at Information Technology Intelligence Corp., compared the possibility of a $35-or-less basic tablet computer to a disposable camera. "At that price," she said, "I wouldn't hesitate to have a few on hand." Instead of keeping it up with support and maintenance, she said she might simply dump it at the end of its lifespan and get another. Such a device could be used for, say, a quick web surf while in the kitchen. DiDio noted that there could also be a large market in developing countries outside of India, but she cautioned that a device so dependent on open-source software would, if used on a regular basis, need some access to regular tech support. But Apple need not worry. In the foreseeable future, DiDio predicted, such an inexpensive and basic tablet is unlikely to "appreciably put pricing pressures on the higher-end laptops or tablets."
 

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[quote name='passerbyeus;22935]http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20100723/tc_nf/74445A tablet computer for $35. That's the estimated retail price of a prototype basic touchscreen tablet developed by the government of India. The device' date=' which uses the open-source Linux operating system, was unveiled Thursday by Kapil Sibal, India's human-resource development minister. "This is our answer to M.I.T.'s $100 computer," he told the Economic Times. $10, Eventually His reference is to the $100 laptop that M.I.T. Media Lab cofounder Nicholas Negroponte set as a goal when he founded One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) in 2005. The main idea was to build an innovative, inexpensive computer to be used by children in developing countries. But the Indian government thought that even $100 was too expensive, so it started developing its own. In the meantime, OLPC's laptop was developed and released, but at an eventual price of about $200. OLPC announced in the spring that it would develop and launch a basic tablet computer for $99. The Indian tablet was developed by researchers and students at the Indian Institute of Technology and the Indian Institute of Science at Sibal's urging. He has told news media that the goal is to eventually get the price closer to $10. The Indian government, which is undertaking a major educational technology initiative, will subsidize the tablet, bringing the near-term price down to $20. The prototype has no hard drive but uses a memory card, can run on solar power, and incorporates open-source software. The government said it supports web browsing, word processing, video conferencing, and other applications. A previous effort by the Indian government, announced last year, to develop a $10 laptop ended with a prototype handheld device that has apparently been abandoned. 'Have a Few on Hand' The government has said that at least one Taiwanese manufacturer, in addition to other computer makers, is interested in building the device, although no arrangements have been made. Laura DiDio, a research fellow at Information Technology Intelligence Corp., compared the possibility of a $35-or-less basic tablet computer to a disposable camera. "At that price," she said, "I wouldn't hesitate to have a few on hand." Instead of keeping it up with support and maintenance, she said she might simply dump it at the end of its lifespan and get another. Such a device could be used for, say, a quick web surf while in the kitchen. DiDio noted that there could also be a large market in developing countries outside of India, but she cautioned that a device so dependent on open-source software would, if used on a regular basis, need some access to regular tech support. But Apple need not worry. In the foreseeable future, DiDio predicted, such an inexpensive and basic tablet is unlikely to "appreciably put pricing pressures on the higher-end laptops or tablets."[/QUOTE']simputer redux... simputer was failure... so...
 
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