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Loose Power Connection


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#1 Jimbo_Bats

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Posted 30 January 2011 - 06:42 PM

Just for info, I had a sloppy power connection and I'd started seeing intermittent charging. Took the back off my tab and had a dig around. Turns out the connections on the power socket had both failed.

          X---X
            |      |
          0    0
______|      |_______

Excuse the ascii art - didn't take a photo. Bottom line is outer edge of motherboard 0 and X are soldered connections, X being unconnected.

The socket has four solder points, the back two also control the friction between the male plug. I took the black cover off the socket and noted that the connection bends down from those two to force against the plug. So simply cleaned off the older solder, held the inner connections down (the 'X's in the diagram) against the motherboard and resoldered - note there is an inner button on the socket that the contacts sit over to seat them - wiggle the connection a little to seat it before soldering in place. No longer sloppy and charges to full now. 

#2 omarahum

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Posted 30 January 2011 - 09:45 PM

:o  Very interesting!  The Omen sent me his tablet after his touchscreen cracked so I could replace my tablets insides with his, which I finally did a few days ago.  However, I am so used to keeping the tablet plugged that I really haven't used it on battery power much, but I have noticed that when I do have it plugged in, the battery meter would start jumping all over the place sometimes, from 100 to 67 to 98 then back down to 65, over and over again, thought maybe it was my power adapter, but after reading this, maybe it's the actual power connection.  I wish I knew about hardware and how to solder  :(

Thanks for the info and insight!

#3 Jimbo_Bats

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 05:37 AM

First off I'd check the connections at the back. Mine moved fairly freely. Nudge them gently and if they aren't attached or the solder is cracked (dry joint) give it a whirl.

Its not too difficult in this case as the connections are fairly chunky (not like the internal Wifi mod). A simple 15-21watt soldering iron, tweezers (fine point long nose pliers), solder and either solder braid or solder sucker are all the tools I used. You can get away with just the iron and tweezers/pliers.

  • Remove the top of the power connection using tweezers/pliers
        It doesn't form an integral part of the power connection and can be glued back/taped back later- you should see a gap at the back to enable you to gently pry it up.
  • Let the soldering iron heat up.
  • Tin the bit
        E.g. Hold solder against the tip of the iron until it runs freely across the entire tip head (flat surface), then clean off (wipe on a wet sponge/flick off onto floor)
  • Hold the iron to the first joint mentioned as flat as possible until the solder runs freely.
        In most electronics you are aiming for as short a contact time as possible so as not to damage the component, this is a nice easy project difficult to damage connections
  • Use the tweezers/pliers and gently wiggle the connection terminal pushing firmly into the solder
        You could remove the solder using the braid or sucker and apply fresh solder - either way works. Ensure the button in the plastic aligns with the terminal - it should sit snuggly over it.
  • Rinse and repeat on the other side
  • Test connection
  • Apply a little silicon or use electrical tape to hold the cap firmly on the connection.

If you get this wrong you can always have another try as there are no sensitive components close enough to the connections to be affected by heat.

#4 omarahum

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 10:18 AM

Wow, great tutorial!

Can i ask a stupid question?  I don't own a real soldering iron, but many years back I got a Coleman Cold Heat battery operated solderer as a Christmas stocking stuffer from my sister.  Would that be able to do the job if it does turn out to be a loose connection?  Thanks again for the info!

#5 Jimbo_Bats

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 05:10 AM

Yes that should be fine. All you are doing is melting the solder or cleaning away and resoldering. Sounds like a great tool if its similar to the one below.

http://www.amazon.co...g/dp/B0009JY6P2

#6 omarahum

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 01:38 PM

Cool, thanks.  I think it's he same one as the link, not sure what model number I have, can't find it on the solderer.  I just thought I remembered reading somewhere that battery powered soldering irons weren't good to use for certain situations, don't remember which ones though.....

#7 you_will_forget

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 05:08 AM

Hi there,

Big thanks to Omarahum for giving me the link to this thread.

I've followed the process (my dogs knocked the tablet off the table and it stopped charging, hence the reason I was asking for help with the issue), and the tablet now works absolutely fine, but only when it's plugged in. The battery itself won't charge, it just stays at 6% and turns itself off when I unplug the charger lead.

Is this likely to be just my crappy soldering, or is there something else I should look at?

Any help would be hugely appreciated.

Jo

#8 tsukaza

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 09:25 AM

Probably a cold solder joint to start with, the drop knocked it loose. A clean solid re-solder point is pretty strong. Do it right and it will be good for years to come.
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#9 omarahum

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 11:36 PM

First off I'd check the connections at the back. Mine moved fairly freely. Nudge them gently and if they aren't attached or the solder is cracked (dry joint) give it a whirl.

Its not too difficult in this case as the connections are fairly chunky (not like the internal Wifi mod). A simple 15-21watt soldering iron, tweezers (fine point long nose pliers), solder and either solder braid or solder sucker are all the tools I used. You can get away with just the iron and tweezers/pliers.

  • Remove the top of the power connection using tweezers/pliers
    It doesn't form an integral part of the power connection and can be glued back/taped back later- you should see a gap at the back to enable you to gently pry it up.
  • Let the soldering iron heat up.
  • Tin the bit
    E.g. Hold solder against the tip of the iron until it runs freely across the entire tip head (flat surface), then clean off (wipe on a wet sponge/flick off onto floor)
  • Hold the iron to the first joint mentioned as flat as possible until the solder runs freely.
    In most electronics you are aiming for as short a contact time as possible so as not to damage the component, this is a nice easy project difficult to damage connections
  • Use the tweezers/pliers and gently wiggle the connection terminal pushing firmly into the solder
    You could remove the solder using the braid or sucker and apply fresh solder - either way works. Ensure the button in the plastic aligns with the terminal - it should sit snuggly over it.
  • Rinse and repeat on the other side
  • Test connection
  • Apply a little silicon or use electrical tape to hold the cap firmly on the connection.

If you get this wrong you can always have another try as there are no sensitive components close enough to the connections to be affected by heat.

Since my ZT-280 C91's battery stopped working, thought I'd try to finally fix my Original 10" ZT-180....

I still never have used a soldering iron and don't have a solder wick or sucker yet, don't know how to properly clean the area being fixed, and can't seem to get the solder wire to melt, but the old solder that was already there seemed to melt and bonded to the power connection, which now seems stable (and the red LED no longer flickers on and off)....

So even though I'm not doing it correctly, just wanted to say thanks Jim!

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